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It’s time for a rural renaissance
From clean air and water to beautiful, bountiful landscapes, we believe that rural areas are invaluable. Rural communities can also drive economic growth by helping to create smart  bioeconomy  solutions.

We created the Biobord online platform to bring experts together with innovative projects, in the Baltic Sea region initially, that can reinvigorate rural areas and nurture their economies while contributing to a more sustainable future for all.
Find out more
It’s time for a rural renaissance
From clean air and water to beautiful, bountiful landscapes, we believe that rural areas are invaluable. Rural communities can also drive economic growth by helping to create smart  bioeconomy  solutions.

We created the Biobord online platform to bring experts together with innovative projects, in the Baltic Sea region initially, that can reinvigorate rural areas and nurture their economies while contributing to a more sustainable future for all.
Find out more
Select language
Latvija
Norge
Suomi
Polska
The challenge
Rural areas in the Baltic region face numerous threats including shrinking populations, underutilization of resources, and megatrends like urbanization and climate change.
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The average population decline in rural areas in Finland, Latvia, Poland, and Norway between 1970 and 2018
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The overall decline in these areas during the same period, which has led to an increased dependency ratio
What can we do about this?
The solution
The bioresources of the future can be found in rural areas. This makes them natural starting places for developing and testing advances in the bioeconomy – smart economic solutions that use biotechnology and bio-based materials.

Many countries around the Baltic sea are currently implementing bioeconomy initiatives, with a significant number of EU-level initiatives also in place. This will stimulate the economies of rural areas and create employment opportunities that attract more people to live there.
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The EU’s target for creating new bioeconomy jobs by 2030
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The current annual turnover of the bioeconomy in the EU
What can we do to help?
Introducing Biobord
 Biobord is an online forum where researchers, entrepreneurs, and business developers can meet and collaborate on innovative bioeconomic solutions that benefit all of us.

The bioeconomy encourages economic growth and supports environmental and social sustainability.
How does this work in practice?
Finland
Norway
Latvia
Poland
A digital solution linking farmers to the service providers and workforce they need
Research to support the sustainable management of wildlife populations in the Northern Hemisphere
Using advanced technology and knowledge sharing to promote high-value organic farming
Promoting biomass heating to improve air quality and living standards for residents in spa towns
Register
to be part of the growing Biobord platform
Register for Biobord
Biobord is the place for you if you’re interested in exploring viable and sustainable bio-based business practices and networking with bioeconomy developers across the Baltic Sea Region.
Connect with people who share your interests, team up on projects, and get support from our network of bioeconomy experts to build your business or launch your innovation onto the market.
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. The following SDGs are common to all of our projects: 
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
The challenge
Rural areas in the Baltic region face numerous threats including shrinking populations, underutilization of resources, and megatrends like urbanization and climate change.
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The average population decline in rural areas in Finland, Latvia, Poland, and Norway between 1970 and 2018
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The overall decline in these areas during the same period, which has led to an increased dependency ratio
What can we do about this?
The solution
The bioresources of the future can be found in rural areas. This makes them natural starting places for developing and testing advances in the bioeconomy – smart economic solutions that use biotechnology and bio-based materials.
Many countries around the Baltic sea are currently implementing bioeconomy initiatives, with a significant number of EU-level initiatives also in place. This will stimulate the economies of rural areas and create employment opportunities that attract more people to live there.
{{ akViewModel["925:117_0"].vmValue }}
The EU’s target for creating new bioeconomy jobs by 2030
{{ akViewModel["925:120_0"].vmValue }}
The current annual turnover of the bioeconomy in the EU
What can we do to help?
Introducing Biobord
 Biobord is an online forum where researchers, entrepreneurs, and business developers can meet and collaborate on innovative bioeconomic solutions that benefit all of us.
The bioeconomy encourages economic growth and supports environmental and social sustainability.
How does this work in practice?
Finland
A digital solution linking farmers to the service providers and workforce they need
Norway
Research to support the sustainable management of wildlife populations in the Northern Hemisphere
Latvia
Using advanced technology and knowledge sharing to promote high-value organic farming
Poland
Promoting biomass heating to improve air quality and living standards for residents in spa towns
Register
to be part of the growing Biobord platform
Register for Biobord
Biobord is the place for you if you’re interested in exploring viable and sustainable bio-based business practices and networking with bioeconomy developers across the Baltic Sea Region.
Connect with people who share your interests, team up on projects, and get support from our network of bioeconomy experts to build your business or launch your innovation onto the market.
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. The following SDGs are common to all of our projects: 
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the
Northern Hemisphere
Research to support the sustainable management of wildlife populations in the Northern Hemisphere
Start
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the
Northern Hemisphere
Rural land could be used more efficiently 
In Norway for example, small game hunting (mainly grouse) could contribute 90 million € annually to local communities by 2028.
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the
Northern Hemisphere
Rural land could be used more efficiently 
Sustainable management is key 
Ecologically sustainable management is key to building a successful future for rural economies. For example, falling willow grouse populations in Norway have led to a Red List status of “near threatened”. By improving our knowledge and management models of wild game hunting, we can safeguard our wildlife while maximizing the contribution hunting makes to the local economy.
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the
Northern Hemisphere
Rural land could be used more efficiently 
Sustainable management is key 
More information is needed to ensure better management
 Research can help us establish sustainable management practices while providing information to enable the development of an “experience economy” that creates value for rural communities.
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the
Northern Hemisphere
Rural land could be used more efficiently 
Sustainable management is key 
More information is needed to ensure better management
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
We want to support the sustainable management of rural land and wildlife.

The Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, part of the Biobord network, has implemented a pilot project to help local communities in the Northern Hemisphere manage grouse populations while raising revenue by offering rural experiences.
Find out how
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the
Northern Hemisphere
Rural land could be used more efficiently 
We’re developing methods for monitoring and managing wildlife populations that create ecological, economic, and social sustainability benefits.
Learn more
Sustainable management is key 
An experience-based approach can increase income from small game hunting.
Learn more
More information is needed to ensure better management
Unique experiences in rural areas can be enjoyed by locals and visitors alike.
Learn more
Managing wildlife populations sustainably
Biobord helps bring leading scientists together with key decision-makers in the Northern Hemisphere to increase cooperation and research.

We work with world-class researchers in wildlife ecology and people with extensive experience in surveillance and private and public land management. Currently, we are part of a group monitoring data for willow grouse as a pilot project.

In areas with grouse populations, monitoring is carried out according to recognized scientific methods – with population management models implemented based on research and practical experience.

The end result should be data that help us ensure better management of grouse populations in the countries taking part in the pilot, helping create sustainable and economically valuable activities for rural areas.
Close
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Generating more income for local communities
Rural land which is offered for small game hunting is being underutilized. By moving beyond simple hunting to offering experiences, we’ve found that the income from grouse hunting can be higher – without increasing bag limits (the amount of animals that can be hunted during the hunting season).

We want to share information and practical insights with rural land owners to enable them to create experiences that include for example camping and guided tours, even based around non-hunting activities. Another aim of this initiative is to encourage rural land owners to communicate and cooperate with each other for mutual benefit.

The end goal is improved environmental, economic and social sustainability in rural areas.
Close
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Creating rural experiences for everyone
A rural experience economy can be built around natural environments that are being managed in an ecologically sustainable way, with viable local communities as the goal. Vital wildlife populations – if managed with a research-based and collaborative approach – are renewable natural resources that can be supported, not damaged, by the experience economy.

Experiences can be built around hunting small game, without increasing the amount of animals being hunted, as well as other rural activities. This method of sustainable management ensures that rural areas can thrive economically and continue to be enjoyed by the people who live there as well as visitors from other areas and countries – without threatening the well-being and populations of local wildlife.
Close
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. For this pilot project, the following SDGs are relevant: 
Goal 6:  Clean water and sanitation
Our project helps to protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes.
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
We’re helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
We’re helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 15:  Life on land
Our project helps to ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
We’re enhancing the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
Currently, hunters spend 63 million € per year on small game hunting in Norway – and this amount could be increased significantly with better organized service ecosystems in rural areas.
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Current yearly income from small game hunting in Norway
{{ akViewModel["636:1194_0"].vmValue }}
Projected yearly income from small game hunting in Norway by 2028
Close
“Near thretened” (NT) is a status designated by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. It does not signify that a species is threatened, but that it may be in the future. For this reason, assessing the status of NT species more often and trying to uncover the reasons behind their changing populations is recommended.
Extinct
Threatened
Lower risk
EX
EW
CR
EN
VU
cd
nt
lc
Close
In order to ensure that grouse populations can be sustainably managed in all the countries where they live in the Northern Hemisphere, more research is needed to establish why (or whether) the population in a given area is changing, and the role that hunting plays in this.

Meanwhile, if people in rural areas focus on exploiting the thriving “experience economy” to create hunting experiences for visitors – which could include activities like guided tours and camping – they can bring in additional revenue streams without preventing hunting restrictions from being imposed where needed.
Close
Headline of source here!

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nibh integer malesuada vel velit. Faucibus duis tortor feugiat faucibus duis ut. Diam quis tristique fringilla aliquam nulla metus. Fringilla at porttitor iaculis nunc libero id.




Explore source
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the Northern Hemisphere
Research to support the sustainable management of wildlife populations in the Northern Hemisphere
Start
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the Northern Hemisphere
Rural land could be used more efficiently 
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
In Norway for example, small game hunting (mainly grouse) could contribute 90 million € annually to local communities by 2028.
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the Northern Hemisphere
Sustainable management is key 
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Ecologically sustainable management is key to building a successful future for rural economies. For example, falling willow grouse populations in Norway have led to a Red List status of “near threatened”. By improving our knowledge and management models of wild game hunting, we can safeguard our wildlife while maximizing the contribution hunting makes to the local economy.
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the Northern Hemisphere
More information is needed to ensure better management
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
 Research can help us establish sustainable management practices while providing information to enable the development of an “experience economy” that creates value for rural communities.
Rural renaissance
Sustainable wildlife management in the Northern Hemisphere
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
We want to support the sustainable management of rural land and wildlife.

The Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, part of the Biobord network, has implemented a pilot project to help local communities in the Northern Hemisphere manage grouse populations while raising revenue by offering rural experiences.
Find out how
Currently, hunters spend 63 million € per year on small game hunting in Norway – and this amount could be increased significantly with better organized service ecosystems in rural areas.
{{ akViewModel["968:356_0"].vmValue }}
Current yearly income from small game hunting in Norway
{{ akViewModel["968:359_0"].vmValue }}
Projected yearly income from small game hunting in Norway by 2028
“Near thretened” (NT) is a status designated by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. It does not signify that a species is threatened, but that it may be in the future. For this reason, assessing the status of NT species more often and trying to uncover the reasons behind their changing populations is recommended.
Extinct
Threatened
Lower risk
EX
EW
CR
EN
VU
cd
nt
lc
In order to ensure that grouse populations can be sustainably managed in all the countries where they live in the Northern Hemisphere, more research is needed to establish why (or whether) the population in a given area is changing, and the role that hunting plays in this.

Meanwhile, if people in rural areas focus on exploiting the thriving “experience economy” to create hunting experiences for visitors – which could include activities like guided tours and camping – they can bring in additional revenue streams without preventing hunting restrictions from being imposed where needed.
Headline of source here!

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nibh integer malesuada vel velit. Faucibus duis tortor feugiat faucibus duis ut. Diam quis tristique fringilla aliquam nulla metus. Fringilla at porttitor iaculis nunc libero id.






Explore source
We’re developing methods for monitoring and managing wildlife populations that create ecological, economic, and social sustainability benefits.
Learn more
An experience-based approach can increase income from small game hunting.
Learn more
Unique experiences in rural areas can be enjoyed by locals and visitors alike.
Learn more
Managing wildlife populations sustainably
Biobord helps bring leading scientists together with key decision-makers in the Northern Hemisphere to increase cooperation and research.

We work with world-class researchers in wildlife ecology and people with extensive experience in surveillance and private and public land management. Currently, we are part of a group monitoring data for willow grouse as a pilot project.

In areas with grouse populations, monitoring is carried out according to recognized scientific methods – with population management models implemented based on research and practical experience.

The end result should be data that help us ensure better management of grouse populations in the countries taking part in the pilot, helping create sustainable and economically valuable activities for rural areas.
Close
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Generating more income for local communities
Rural land which is offered for small game hunting is being underutilized. By moving beyond simple hunting to offering experiences, we’ve found that the income from grouse hunting can be higher – without increasing bag limits (the amount of animals that can be hunted during the hunting season).

We want to share information and practical insights with rural land owners to enable them to create experiences that include for example camping and guided tours, even based around non-hunting activities. Another aim of this initiative is to encourage rural land owners to communicate and cooperate with each other for mutual benefit.

The end goal is improved environmental, economic and social sustainability in rural areas.
Close
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
Creating rural experiences for everyone
A rural experience economy can be built around natural environments that are being managed in an ecologically sustainable way, with viable local communities as the goal. Vital wildlife populations – if managed with a research-based and collaborative approach – are renewable natural resources that can be supported, not damaged, by the experience economy.

Experiences can be built around hunting small game, without increasing the amount of animals being hunted, as well as other rural activities. This method of sustainable management ensures that rural areas can thrive economically and continue to be enjoyed by the people who live there as well as visitors from other areas and countries – without threatening the well-being and populations of local wildlife.
Close
Photo:  Fredrik Bye
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. The following SDGs are common to all of our projects: 
Goal 6:  Clean water and sanitation
Our project helps to protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers and lakes.
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 15:  Life on land
Our project helps to ensure the conservation, restoration and sustainable use of terrestrial and inland freshwater ecosystems and their services, in particular forests, wetlands, mountains and drylands, in line with obligations under international agreements.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
Promoting biomass heating to improve air quality and living standards for residents in spa towns
Start
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
Air quality matters
In Polish rural areas, ensuring that air is as clean as possible is important for the health of people who live there.
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
Air quality matters
Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój rely on health tourism
As spa destinations, the municipalities of Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój rely on their reputations for health to attract visitors and keep the local economy healthy. 
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
Air quality matters
Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój rely on health tourism
The way households are heated affects air quality
Switching from old-fashioned home heating to more modern methods can help improve rural air quality.
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
Air quality matters
Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój rely on health tourism
The way households are heated affects air quality
We want to help tourism reach its full potential in Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój and improve air quality in rural areas of Poland.

The Regional Science and Technology Center in Poland, part of the Biobord community, has set up a pilot project with Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship province to monitor local air quality and use the data produced to encourage residents to switch to bio-based heating solutions.
Find out how
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
UN SDGs
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Back to start
Improving air quality
Our studies are monitoring air quality by tracking small particle pollution and sulfur dioxide.
Learn more
Promoting a healthy image for Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój
Spa towns and rural regions can attract more visitors by promoting environmental initiatives.
Learn more
Encouraging more environmentally friendly heating 
Pellet burners are a more climate and health friendly method for home heating.
Learn more
Improving air quality
PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 are  tiny particles in the air  (PM stands for “particulate matter”) that can have a negative effect on people’s health – they are absorbed through the lungs directly into the bloodstream and have been linked to cancer, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory illness. The numbers refer to the size of the particle in micrometers, which is 0.0001 cm. To put that into context, PM2.5 particles are so small that thousands of them would fit within the dot of a letter “i”.

Sulfur dioxide is an airborne pollutant that can negatively impact health and one of the chemicals that can lead to smog formation.

When PM1, PM2.5, PM10, and sulfur dioxide are emitted from chimneys shorter than 10 meters tall (which includes most house chimneys), these pollutants are more likely to stay low to the ground within a localized area, increasing smog in places where people live.

By measuring these pollutants, we can better establish what the air quality is like in Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój and measure the improvements made by our pilot project to switch to more environmentally friendly heating.
Close
Promoting a healthy image for Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój
By encouraging a switch to more environmentally friendly heating methods, rural communities such as Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój can be at the forefront of promoting positive environmental change.

Ensuring that the air is clean will also improve the local economy by demonstrating that Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój continue to be places that people can visit for health reasons.
Close
Encouraging more environmentally friendly heating
Old-fashioned home heating methods that burn fossil fuels increase the amount of particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10) and sulfur dioxide in the air. When these pollutants are released from chimneys that are shorter than 10 meters, they are spread out and remain in a localized area, affecting air quality.

Modern pellet burners reduce smog by lowering emissions of PM1, PM2.5, PM10, and sulfur dioxide compared with more old-fashioned, fossil fuel-based heating systems.

In addition, pellet burners allow people to continue using local fuel sources based on the forestry industry.
Close
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. For this pilot project, the following SDGs are relevant: 
Goal 3:  Good health and well-being
Our project helps to reduce the number of illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air pollution and contamination.
Goal 7:  Affordable and clean energy 
We’re helping to ensure access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services and increase the share of renewable energy in the energy mix in Poland.
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 11:  Sustainable cities and communities
Our goal is to help reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 13:  Climate action
We’re working to improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój are spa towns where tourists come to enjoy the well-being services on offer – their reputation for promoting health means that tracking air quality and ensuring that it’s good is of vital importance.
{{ akViewModel["703:1241_0"].vmValue }}
Number of inhabitants in Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój
{{ akViewModel["703:1244_0"].vmValue }}
Number of tourists visiting Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój every year
Close
Particulate matter is one factor that can be used to measure air quality, with particle size indicated numerically, for example PM2.5 and PM10. We measured the levels of PM10, known as course particulate matter, in the spa towns of Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój. The World Health Organization’s guideline value for annual average PM10 is 20 micrograms per cubic meter (μg/m3) of air.
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Annual average PM10 found per m3 of air in Busko-Zdrój in 2019-20
{{ akViewModel["1217:6_0"].vmValue }}
Annual average PM10 found per m3 of air in Solec-Zdrój in 2019-20
Close
Switching from a heating system that uses a coal boiler to one that uses a pellet boiler will reduce the amount of harmful PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) released into the air by 32 times. Let’s see what would happen if we replaced coal burners with pellet burners in Poland.

Number of households replacing coal boilers with pellet boilers:
{{ akViewModel["777:1350_0"].vmValue }}
Potential annual reduction  in PM2.5 emissions:
{{ akViewModel["942:1885_0"].vmValue }}
This is equal to
{{ akViewModel["942:1892_0"].vmValue }}
The use of old-fashioned, less cleanly-burning methods to heat homes has an impact on local air quality. If a chimney is shorter than 10 meters tall, which is the case for most homes in the area, emitted particles and sulfur dioxide remain in a more localized area.
Close
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
Promoting biomass heating to improve air quality and living standards for residents in spa towns
Start
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
Air quality matters
In Polish rural areas, ensuring that air is as clean as possible is important for the health of people who live there.
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój rely on health tourism
As spa destinations, the municipalities of Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój rely on their reputations for health to attract visitors and keep the local economy healthy. 
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
The way households are heated affects air quality
Switching from old-fashioned home heating to more modern methods can help improve rural air quality.
Rural renaissance
Improving air quality in Poland
We want to help tourism reach its full potential in Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój and improve air quality in rural areas of Poland.

The Regional Science and Technology Center in Poland, part of the Biobord community, has set up a pilot project with Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship province to monitor local air quality and use the data produced to encourage residents to switch to bio-based heating solutions.
Find out how
Particulate matter is one factor that can be used to measure air quality, with particle size indicated numerically, for example PM2.5 and PM10. We measured the levels of PM10, known as course particulate matter, in the spa towns of Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój. The World Health Organization’s guideline value for annual average PM10 is 20 micrograms per cubic meter (μg/m3) of air.
{{ akViewModel["1228:45_0"].vmValue }}
Annual average PM10 found per m3 of air in Busko-Zdrój in 2019-20
{{ akViewModel["1228:48_0"].vmValue }}
Annual average PM10 found per m3 of air in Solec-Zdrój in 2019-20
Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój are spa towns where tourists come to enjoy the well-being services on offer – their reputation for promoting health means that tracking air quality and ensuring that it’s good is of vital importance.
{{ akViewModel["970:1292_0"].vmValue }}
Number of inhabitants in Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój
{{ akViewModel["970:1295_0"].vmValue }}
Number of tourists visiting Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój every year
Switching from a heating system that uses a coal boiler to one that uses a pellet boiler will reduce the amount of harmful PM2.5 (fine particulate matter) released into the air by 32 times. Let’s see what would happen if we replaced coal burners with pellet burners in Poland.

Number of households replacing coal boilers with pellet boilers:
{{ akViewModel["970:1299_0"].vmValue }}
Potential annual reduction  in PM2.5 emissions:
{{ akViewModel["970:1307_0"].vmValue }}
This is equal to
{{ akViewModel["970:1310_0"].vmValue }}
The use of old-fashioned, less cleanly-burning methods to heat homes has an impact on local air quality. If a chimney is shorter than 10 meters tall, which is the case for most homes in the area, emitted particles and sulfur dioxide remain in a more localized area.
Our studies are monitoring air quality by tracking small particle pollution and sulfur dioxide.
Learn more
Spa towns and rural regions can attract more visitors by promoting environmental initiatives.
Learn more
Pellet burners are a more climate and health friendly method for home heating.
Learn more
Improving air quality
PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 are tiny particles in the air (PM stands for “particulate matter”) that can have a negative effect on people’s health – they are absorbed through the lungs directly into the bloodstream and have been linked to cancer, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory illness. The numbers refer to the size of the particle in micrometers, which is 0.0001 cm. To put that into context, PM2.5 particles are so small that thousands of them would fit within the dot of a letter “i”.

Sulfur dioxide is an airborne pollutant that can negatively impact health and one of the chemicals that can lead to smog formation.

When PM1, PM2.5, PM10, and sulfur dioxide are emitted from chimneys shorter than 10 meters tall (which includes most house chimneys), these pollutants are more likely to stay low to the ground within a localized area, increasing smog in places where people live.

By measuring these pollutants, we can better establish what the air quality is like in Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój and measure the improvements made by our pilot project to switch to more environmentally friendly heating.
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Promoting a healthy image for Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój
By encouraging a switch to more environmentally friendly heating methods, rural communities such as Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój can be at the forefront of promoting positive environmental change.

Ensuring that the air is clean will also improve the local economy by demonstrating that Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój continue to be places that people can visit for health reasons.
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Encouraging more environmentally friendly heating
Old-fashioned home heating methods that burn fossil fuels increase the amount of particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10) and sulfur dioxide in the air. When these pollutants are released from chimneys that are shorter than 10 meters, they are spread out and remain in a localized area, affecting air quality.

Modern pellet burners reduce smog by lowering emissions of PM1, PM2.5, PM10, and sulfur dioxide compared with more old-fashioned, fossil fuel-based heating systems.

In addition, pellet burners allow people to continue using local fuel sources based on the forestry industry.
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We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. The following SDGs are common to all of our projects: 
Goal 3:  Good health and well-being
Our project helps to reduce the number of illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air pollution and contamination.
Goal 7:  Affordable and clean energy 
We’re helping to ensure access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services and increase the share of renewable energy in the energy mix in Poland.
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 11:  Sustainable cities and communities
Our goal is to help reduce the adverse per capita environmental impact of cities, including by paying special attention to air quality.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 13:  Climate action
We’re working to improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
Using advanced technology and knowledge sharing to promote high-value organic farming
Start
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
 Rural land is not being used efficiently enough
 Rural areas in Latvia would benefit from being used for more high-value organic farming.
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
 Rural land is not being used efficiently enough
There is a lack of knowledge about organic farming 
Farmers in Latvia lack understanding of organic farming – including which crops to grow, how best to grow them, and their market potential.
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
 Rural land is not being used efficiently enough
There is a lack of knowledge about organic farming 
Farming is not valuable enough economically
Farming practices that are commonly used in Latvia could be adapted to offer a greater contribution to the economy – and to be more environmentally friendly.
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
 Rural land is not being used efficiently enough
There is a lack of knowledge about organic farming 
Farming is not valuable enough economically
We want to help rural areas economically and encourage environmentally friendly farming solutions.

The Institute for Environmental Solutions, part of the Biobord platform, has created a pilot project with the aim of studying organic farming to find out what works best in Latvia and then share this knowledge.
Find out how
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
Using land smartly
Organically grown medicinal plants make economic sense for farmers.
Learn more
Sharing knowledge 
We want to promote knowledge sharing so that people can take up organic farming easily and farmers can support each other.
Learn more
Promoting sustainability 
Organic farming is more environmentally friendly than non-organic alternatives.
Learn more
Using land smartly
Agricultural production must be effective, competitive, and profitable while also minimizing any environmental impact. Digital technologies like remote and local sensing, data analytics, artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), automation, and robotics offer opportunities to address these challenges. Despite this, the uptake of these new technologies in the agricultural sector has been slow.

Our project is creating a data-based service to support farmers. We’re developing and testing new technologies including drones, ground-based sensors, and machine learning methods for data analysis. The goal is to rapidly evaluate what works best for growing organic crops including medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs). Parameters to be measured and analyzed include yield volume estimation, plant stress, weed detection, plant blooming success, and the role of active compounds.

By developing these technologies and gathering data, we can demonstrate the most effective ways to grow organic MAPs, starting in Latvia and then extending to other interested countries.
Total potential economic value of MAP cultivation in Latvia:
{{ akViewModel["1377:4779_0"].vmValue }}
This calculation is based on all agricultural land being used to cultivate chamomile.
Close
Sharing knowledge
In order to have an impact, knowledge needs to be shared. That’s why a key part of our project involves data sharing. This means that we’re not just developing a technology service with sensor-equipped drones, ground-based sensors, and data collection and analysis; we’re also sharing our data and process information with farmers.

In this way, we can demonstrate in concrete terms why farmers should switch to more economically valuable and environmentally friendly organic farming from lower-value agriculture, as well as how to do it.
Close
Promoting sustainability
Primary agriculture in Europe is facing the challenge of increasing calls to become greener in terms of managing natural resources sustainably, reducing its environmental footprint, and minimizing climate change. Latvia is particularly well suited to growing more high-value organic crops, which can improve both environmental and economic sustainability for farmers.
Energy used by conventional agriculture
Energy used by organic agriculture
{{ akViewModel["788:491_0"].vmValue }}
{{ akViewModel["1190:0_0"].vmValue }}
Average emissions of conventional agriculture (CO₂ equivalent)
Average emissions of organic agriculture (CO₂ equivalent)
{{ akViewModel["1190:3_0"].vmValue }}
{{ akViewModel["1190:4_0"].vmValue }}
Close
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. For this pilot project, the following SDGs are relevant: 
Goal 2:  Zero hunger
Our project helps ensure sustainable food production systems and the implementation of resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, and that progressively improve land and soil quality.
Goal 6:  Clean water and sanitation
We’re helping to increase water-use efficiency in farming.
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 14:  Life below water
Our project helps to prevent and reduce marine pollution from land-based activities like farming.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
Currently, farmers in Latvia are focusing on growing high-input, low-income crops. They have the opportunity to increase the diversity of the crops they grow though. With demand for them growing in Europe and worldwide, medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) are a viable option.

In Latvia, the  gross margin  for organically grown oats is  {{ akViewModel["784:1688_4"].vmValue }}  per hectare, while the gross margin for chamomile is  {{ akViewModel["784:1688_6"].vmValue }}  per hectare.

Despite this, no extensive studies have been carried out relating to which high-value organically grown MAPs grow best in Latvia and what cultivation methods will benefit them most – this means that if they want to change the crops they grow, farmers must essentially start from scratch, risking low yields initially.
Close
Farmers, scientists, and policy makers:
contact us to learn more.

Institute for Environmental Solutions


lidlauks@videsinstituts.lv
+37126425688
Close
Farmers, scientists, and policy makers:
contact us to learn more.

Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences.


marius.kjonsberg@inn.no  // +47 62 54 16 19
Close
Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plants, but excess nitrogen in the soil can enter water systems, where it becomes a pollutant – this is known as leaching. On average, organic farming leads to 57% less nitrogen leaching than conventional agriculture. In Latvia, this can mean a reduction in nitrogen released into the Baltic Sea. Let’s see how much nitrogen leaching can be reduced by switching to organic farming in Latvia.

Hectares of land converted from conventional to organic farming:
{{ akViewModel["1143:4797_0"].vmValue }}
Annual reduction in nitrogen leaching:
{{ akViewModel["1219:18_0"].vmValue }}
There is an  increasing demand  for organically grown produce.
Latvia’s high-quality, clean soil makes it 
well suited  for growing organic crops.

In Latvia, the total land area used for agricultural production in 2017 was 
1,932,000 hectares .

Organic agriculture covered 280,000 hectares in 2018, around 
14.5%  of the total area used for agriculture – meaning there is a lot of potential for increasing the use of organic farming.
Close
When compared with conventional farming methods, organic agriculture provides a higher value per hectare. For organically cultivated medicinal aromatic plants (MAPs) like chamomile, the gross value can be more than ten times higher.

Conventional farming can also cause environmental issues including the widespread use of chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides, which can damage ecosystems. Increasing quality requirements for MAPs, mainly with relation to pesticide residues, have led to increasing interest in organic farming methods.

The use of advanced digital technologies can make small-scale organic agriculture more eco-friendly and efficient. However, the availability of tech for farming is still very limited. There is a need for solutions like more efficient weed control, field diagnostics (for the early detection of diseases, insect infestation, protein assessment, etc.), and monitoring. 
Close
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
Using advanced technology and knowledge sharing to promote high-value organic farming
Start
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
 Rural land is not being used efficiently enough
 Rural areas in Latvia would benefit from being used for more high-value organic farming.
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
There is a lack of knowledge about organic farming 
Farmers in Latvia lack understanding of organic farming – including which crops to grow, how best to grow them, and their market potential.
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
Farming is not valuable enough economically
Farming practices that are commonly used in Latvia could be adapted to offer a greater contribution to the economy – and to be more environmentally friendly.
Rural renaissance
Using technology to improve organic farming in Latvia
We want to help rural areas economically and encourage environmentally friendly farming solutions.

The Institute for Environmental Solutions, part of the Biobord platform, has created a pilot project with the aim of studying organic farming to find out what works best in Latvia and then share this knowledge.
Find out how
Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plants, but excess nitrogen in the soil can enter water systems, where it becomes a pollutant – this is known as leaching. On average, organic farming leads to 57% less nitrogen leaching than conventional agriculture. In Latvia, this can mean a reduction in nitrogen released into the Baltic Sea. Let’s see how much nitrogen leaching can be reduced by switching to organic farming in Latvia.

Hectares of land converted from conventional to organic farming:
{{ akViewModel["1143:4800_0"].vmValue }}
Annual reduction in nitrogen leaching:
{{ akViewModel["1317:4782_0"].vmValue }}
There is an  increasing demand  for organically grown produce. Latvia’s high-quality, clean soil makes it  well suited  for growing organic crops.

In Latvia, the total land area used for agricultural production in 2017 was 
1,932,000 hectares .

Organic agriculture covered 280,000 hectares in 2018, around 
14.5%  of the total area used for agriculture – meaning there is a lot of potential for increasing the use of organic farming.
Close
Farmers, scientists, and policy makers:
contact us to learn more.

Institute for Environmental Solutions


lidlauks@videsinstituts.lv
+37126425688
Farmers, scientists, and policy makers:
contact us to learn more.

Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences


marius.kjonsberg@inn.no {{ akViewModel["1143:4795_5"].vmValue }}
Currently, farmers in Latvia are focusing on growing high-input, low-income crops. They have the opportunity to increase the diversity of the crops they grow though. With demand for them growing in Europe and worldwide, medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs) are a viable option.

In Latvia, the  gross margin  for organically grown oats is  {{ akViewModel["970:1555_4"].vmValue }}  per hectare, while the gross margin for chamomile is  {{ akViewModel["970:1555_6"].vmValue }}  per hectare.

Despite this, no extensive studies have been carried out relating to which high-value organically grown MAPs grow best in Latvia and what cultivation methods will benefit them most – this means that if they want to change the crops they grow, farmers must essentially start from scratch, risking low yields initially.
When compared with conventional farming methods, organic agriculture provides a higher value per hectare. For organically cultivated medicinal aromatic plants (MAPs) like chamomile, the gross value can be more than ten times higher.

Conventional farming can also cause environmental issues including the widespread use of chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides, which can damage ecosystems. Increasing quality requirements for MAPs, mainly with relation to pesticide residues, have led to increasing interest in organic farming methods.

The use of advanced digital technologies can make small-scale organic agriculture more eco-friendly and efficient. However, the availability of tech for farming is still very limited. There is a need for solutions like more efficient weed control, field diagnostics (for the early detection of diseases, insect infestation, protein assessment, etc.), and monitoring. 
Our studies are monitoring air quality by tracking small particle pollution and sulfur dioxide.
Learn more
Spa towns and rural regions can attract more visitors by promoting environmental initiatives.
Learn more
Pellet burners are a more climate and health friendly method for home heating.
Learn more
Using land smartly
Agricultural production must be effective, competitive, and profitable while also minimizing any environmental impact. Digital technologies like remote and local sensing, data analytics, artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), automation, and robotics offer opportunities to address these challenges. Despite this, the uptake of these new technologies in the agricultural sector has been slow.

Our project is creating a data-based service to support farmers. We’re developing and testing new technologies including drones, ground-based sensors, and machine learning methods for data analysis. The goal is to rapidly evaluate what works best for growing organic crops including medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs). Parameters to be measured and analyzed include yield volume estimation, plant stress, weed detection, plant blooming success, and the role of active compounds.

By developing these technologies and gathering data, we can demonstrate the most effective ways to grow organic MAPs, starting in Latvia and then extending to other interested countries.
Total potential economic value of MAP cultivation in Latvia:
{{ akViewModel["972:2_0"].vmValue }}
This calculation is based on all agricultural land being used to cultivate chamomile.
Close
Sharing knowledge
In order to have an impact, knowledge needs to be shared. That’s why a key part of our project involves data sharing. This means that we’re not just developing a technology service with sensor-equipped drones, ground-based sensors, and data collection and analysis; we’re also sharing our data and process information with farmers.

In this way, we can demonstrate in concrete terms why farmers should switch to more economically valuable and environmentally friendly organic farming from lower-value agriculture, as well as how to do it.
Close
Promoting sustainability
Primary agriculture in Europe is facing the challenge of increasing calls to become greener in terms of managing natural resources sustainably, reducing its environmental footprint, and minimizing climate change. Latvia is particularly well suited to growing more high-value organic crops, which can improve both environmental and economic sustainability for farmers.
Energy used by conventional agriculture
{{ akViewModel["1228:35_0"].vmValue }}
Energy used by organic agriculture
{{ akViewModel["1228:36_0"].vmValue }}
Average emissions of conventional agriculture (CO₂ equivalent)
{{ akViewModel["1228:42_0"].vmValue }}
Average emissions of organic agriculture (CO₂ equivalent)
{{ akViewModel["1228:43_0"].vmValue }}
Close
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. The following SDGs are common to all of our projects: 
Goal 2:  Zero hunger
Our project helps ensure sustainable food production systems and the implementation of resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, and that progressively improve land and soil quality.
Goal 6:  Clean water and sanitation
We’re helping to increase water-use efficiency in farming.
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 14:  Life below water
Our project helps to prevent and reduce marine pollution from land-based activities like farming.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
A digital solution linking farmers to the service providers and workforce they need
Start
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
Rural populations in Finland are falling
Of the 310 municipalities in Finland, around 250 expect to see a decrease in the working-age population by 2030.
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
Rural populations in Finland are falling
Services and job opportunities decrease
As the amount of services decrease, more people move away, creating a vicious circle. 
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
Rural populations in Finland are falling
Services and job opportunities decrease
This makes life more difficult for farmers
Farmers are increasingly struggling to find the people and services they need to do their work.
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
Rural populations in Finland are falling
Services and job opportunities decrease
This makes life more difficult for farmers
It’s time to break the cycle!

SSYP Kehitys Oy, part of the Biobord network, has created an app called Waakku that can help farmers to access services and workforce while creating job opportunities for local residents.
Find out how
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
Helping farmers
The Waakku app connects farmers with the workers and experts they need. 
Learn more
Helping rural businesses
The Waakku app helps rural businesses be more efficient. 
Learn more
Helping jobseekers
The Waakku app helps people looking for work to find it. 
Learn more
How the Waakku app helps farmers
The Waakku mobile app is a platform that connects farmers, service providers, and jobseekers. Farmers can post about the people or services they need, and service providers and jobseekers can search and respond to these posts.

This matchmaking feature will make people and services more available to farmers and promote job creation in rural regions. Farmers can also use the app to cooperate for mutual benefit by posting about their needs and what they can offer each other, reducing costs through bulk purchases, trading services, or temporarily loaning equipment and machinery.

Results from a previous initiative


While it’s too early to judge the effectiveness of Waakku just yet, there is a longer-running program promoting communication and cooperation that we can look at. In Central Finland, a group of farmers have been using a service for joint procurement of products and materials. The opportunity to buy in bulk and coordinate logistics has decreased operational costs for the farmers, as shown below.
Farmers’  costs saved  so far with joint procurement (year/farmer):
{{ akViewModel["794:2_0"].vmValue }}
As well as saving money, farmers can reduce their carbon footprint by using Waakku for joint procurement of materials. Let’s see  how many kilograms of CO₂ emissions  could be saved in this way.
Trips saved with joint procurement:
{{ akViewModel["1279:4_0"].vmValue }}
{{ akViewModel["1279:21_0"].vmValue }}
Close
How the Waakku app helps rural businesses
The Waakku mobile app is a platform that connects rural service providers, farmers, and jobseekers. Farmers can post about the people or services they need, and service providers and jobseekers can search and respond to these posts.

This matchmaking feature is expected to make it easier for businesses in rural areas to provide their services to farmers. These service providers will be able to work more efficiently and save resources by grouping tasks. For example, they will have the opportunity to save transport time, costs, and emissions by visiting multiple local farms on a single day.
Close
How the Waakku app helps jobseekers
The Waakku mobile app is a platform that connects jobseekers and farmers. Farmers post about the services they need, and job seekers can search and respond to these posts.

This matchmaking feature is expected to help jobseekers in and around rural communities to find work by making it easy to find what is available locally. This will also help farmers, who very often need more workers to help them deal with seasonal variations when the amount of work increases (for example at harvest time). 
Close
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. For this pilot project, the following SDGs are relevant: 
Goal 2:  Zero hunger
Our project helps ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production. 
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
This will further increase the imbalance in the total dependence ratio (the amount of working people vs the amount of non-working people), which makes service provision for municipalities even harder. This can potentially also drive private investment into areas with smaller risks related to infrastructure and service quality, which are predominantly urban or semi-urban areas.
Close
The municipalities that are losing population are mostly rural municipalities. 
Close
{{ akViewModel["791:550_0"].vmValue }}
of  farmers in central Finland  who responded to a survey carried out by JAMK reported that they have unmet needs for external services at their farms.
Close
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
A digital solution linking farmers to the service providers and workforce they need
Start
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
Rural populations in Finland are falling
Of the 310 municipalities in Finland, around 250 expect to see a decrease in the working-age population by 2030.
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
Services and job opportunities decrease
As the amount of services decrease, more people move away, creating a vicious circle. 
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
This makes life more difficult for farmers
Farmers are increasingly struggling to find the people and services they need to do their work.
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
It’s time to break the cycle!

SSYP Kehitys Oy, part of the Biobord network, has created an app called Waakku that can help farmers to access services and workforce while creating job opportunities for local residents.
Find out how
Rural renaissance
Connecting farmers with services and people
in Finland
UN SDGs
Share
Back to start
The municipalities that are losing population are mostly rural municipalities. 
This will further increase the imbalance in the total dependence ratio (the amount of working people vs the amount of non-working people), which makes service provision for municipalities even harder. This can potentially also drive private investment into areas with smaller risks related to infrastructure and service quality, which are predominantly urban or semi-urban areas.
{{ akViewModel["972:373_0"].vmValue }}
of farmers in central Finland who responded to a survey carried out by JAMK reported that they have unmet needs for external services at their farms.
The Wakkuu app connects farmers with the workers and experts they need. 
Learn more
The Wakkuu app helps rural businesses be more efficient. 
Learn more
The Wakkuu app helps people looking for work to find it. 
Learn more
Improving air quality
The Waakku mobile app is a platform that connects farmers, service providers, and jobseekers. Farmers can post about the people or services they need, and service providers and jobseekers can search and respond to these posts.

This matchmaking feature will make people and services more available to farmers and promote job creation in rural regions. Farmers can also use the app to cooperate for mutual benefit by posting about their needs and what they can offer each other, reducing costs through bulk purchases, trading services, or temporarily loaning equipment and machinery.

Results from a previous initiative

While it’s too early to judge the effectiveness of Waakku just yet, there is a longer-running program promoting communication and cooperation that we can look at. In Central Finland, a group of farmers have been using a service for joint procurement of products and materials. The opportunity to buy in bulk and coordinate logistics has decreased operational costs for the farmers, as shown below.
Farmers’  costs saved  so far with joint procurement (year/farmer):
{{ akViewModel["972:834_0"].vmValue }}
As well as saving money, farmers can reduce their carbon footprint by using Waakku for joint procurement of materials. Let’s see  how many kilograms of CO₂ emissions  could be saved in this way.
Trips saved with joint procurement:
{{ akViewModel["1279:28_0"].vmValue }}
{{ akViewModel["1279:39_0"].vmValue }}
Close
Promoting a healthy image for Busko-Zdrój and Solec-Zdrój
The Waakku mobile app is a platform that connects rural service providers, farmers, and jobseekers. Farmers can post about the people or services they need, and service providers and jobseekers can search and respond to these posts.

This matchmaking feature is expected to make it easier for businesses in rural areas to provide their services to farmers. These service providers will be able to work more efficiently and save resources by grouping tasks. For example, they will have the opportunity to save transport time, costs, and emissions by visiting multiple local farms on a single day.
Close
Encouraging more environmentally friendly heating
The Waakku mobile app is a platform that connects jobseekers and farmers. Farmers post about the services they need, and job seekers can search and respond to these posts.

This matchmaking feature is expected to help jobseekers in and around rural communities to find work by making it easy to find what is available locally. This will also help farmers, who very often need more workers to help them deal with seasonal variations when the amount of work increases (for example at harvest time). 
Close
We help meet the UN SDGs
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a collection of 17 global goals set by the United Nations General Assembly, covering a wide range of social and economic development issues to improve people’s lives and the health of our planet. The following SDGs are common to all of our projects: 
Goal 2:  Zero hunger
Our project helps ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production. 
Goal 8:  Decent work and economic growth
Biobord is helping to achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation. Our projects help improve global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavour to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation.
Goal 12:  Responsible consumption and production
Biobord is helping to achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources in rural areas. We're also working to ensure that people everywhere have the relevant information and awareness for sustainable development and lifestyles in harmony with nature.
Goal 17:  Partnerships for the goals
Biobord helps to enhance the global partnership for sustainable development by mobilizing and sharing knowledge and expertise.
Close
Help us spread the word
Share this report
Close
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The list of cookies we use and their retention periods:
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Information that our cookies collect:
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